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Australian

Bolt Action Allied Star Dice Bag Bolt Action Allied Star Dice Bag
£12.00
Out of stock
Dice bag for Bolt Action
Bolt Action Australian Independent Commando squad Bolt Action Australian Independent Commando squad
£15.00
£14.00
Out of stock
The Australian Army raised a number of units for commando-style operations during the Second World War – the first being the twelve Independent Commando Companies formed between 1941 and 1942. Predominantly serving in New Guinea, the Dutch East Indies and Borneo their task was to perform raids, demolition, sabotage, subversion, and organisation of civil resistance against the Japanese. The Indepen…
Bolt Action Australian Jungle Division infantry section (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian Jungle Division infantry section (Pacific)
£15.00
£13.50
1 in stock
Description In early 1943, the Australian Army reorganised its militia and Australian Imperial Force divisions into a lighter version of the standard British Army organisation. These new Jungle Divisions, had vastly more short-ranged firepower, 981 SMGs as to the previous 400, for instance. The lack of roads or open terrain saw the men of now unnecessary support, transport and anti-aircraft units…
Bolt Action Australian medium mortar team (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian medium mortar team (Pacific)
£7.00
£6.30
1 in stock
Description In most jungle operations the 3-inch mortar was the main, often only, form of artillery support available. In the reorganised Jungle Divisions, from 1943 onwards, the number of mortars was doubled to include two full platoons of these weapons. Models supplied unassembled and unpainted
Bolt Action Australian Militia Infantry Section Bolt Action Australian Militia Infantry Section
£15.00
£13.50
1 in stock
Description The militia was trained and equipped to a lesser degree than their regular counterparts in the Australian Imperial Force and only allowed to be deployed within Australia and its mandated territories. This led to the AIF’s derogatory nickname of Chockos, for the militia – chocolate soldiers who would melt in the heat of battle. There was little love lost between the formations although…
Bolt Action Australian Officer Team (pacific) Bolt Action Australian Officer Team (pacific)
£5.00
£4.50
1 in stock
Description Many Australian officers who commanded militia units in the far flung corners of New Guinea and its surrounding islands were veterans of World War I but had spent decades in civilian trades. By 1943, most officers were either AIF veterans of the campaigns in the Middle East and North Africa or hard-pressed militiamen who had learned their trade on the front lines in New Guinea. Warlord…
Bolt Action Australian PIAT and anti-tank rifle teams (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian PIAT and anti-tank rifle teams (Pacific)
£6.00
£5.40
1 in stock
Description The Australian Army was supplied by Britain with the PIAT anti-tank weapon, but this saw only extremely limited use by the Australians, as the threat from Japanese tanks was minimal. The weapon found more use against Japanese emplacements as an improvised bunker-buster than the role it was designed for. The AIF Divisions brought their anti-tank rifles back with them from the desert cam…
Bolt Action Australian short 25-pdr (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian short 25-pdr (Pacific)
£13.00
£11.70
1 in stock
Description The ubiquitous 25-pdr was the standard artillery piece of the Australian Army in the Pacific Theatre, as it had been in the desert. The complete lack of roads and the dense jungle terrain encountered on the Pacific islands meant that deploying these guns was extremely difficult. One solution was to modify the gun by removing the gun shield and shortening the barrel. These were known as…
Bolt Action Papuan Infantry Battalion section (Pacific) Bolt Action Papuan Infantry Battalion section (Pacific)
£15.00
£13.50
1 in stock
Description These were local men recruited in New Guinea and led by Australian officers and senior NCOs. They were superb jungle fighters who, being local men, were particularly good at reconnaissance. They were also almost impossible to ambush. They fought from the Kokoda campaign right through to end of the war against Imperial Japan. This set contains a metal 10-man section consisting of: 1 NCO…

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Dice bag for Bolt Action
The Australian Army raised a number of units for commando-style operations during the Second World War – the first being the twelve Independent Commando Companies formed between 1941 and 1942. Predominantly serving in New Guinea, the Dutch East Indies and Borneo their task was to perform raids, demolition, sabotage, subversion, and organisation of civil resistance against the Japanese. The Indepen…
Description In early 1943, the Australian Army reorganised its militia and Australian Imperial Force divisions into a lighter version of the standard British Army organisation. These new Jungle Divisions, had vastly more short-ranged firepower, 981 SMGs as to the previous 400, for instance. The lack of roads or open terrain saw the men of now unnecessary support, transport and anti-aircraft units…
Description In most jungle operations the 3-inch mortar was the main, often only, form of artillery support available. In the reorganised Jungle Divisions, from 1943 onwards, the number of mortars was doubled to include two full platoons of these weapons. Models supplied unassembled and unpainted
Description The militia was trained and equipped to a lesser degree than their regular counterparts in the Australian Imperial Force and only allowed to be deployed within Australia and its mandated territories. This led to the AIF’s derogatory nickname of Chockos, for the militia – chocolate soldiers who would melt in the heat of battle. There was little love lost between the formations although…
Description Many Australian officers who commanded militia units in the far flung corners of New Guinea and its surrounding islands were veterans of World War I but had spent decades in civilian trades. By 1943, most officers were either AIF veterans of the campaigns in the Middle East and North Africa or hard-pressed militiamen who had learned their trade on the front lines in New Guinea. Warlord…
Description The Australian Army was supplied by Britain with the PIAT anti-tank weapon, but this saw only extremely limited use by the Australians, as the threat from Japanese tanks was minimal. The weapon found more use against Japanese emplacements as an improvised bunker-buster than the role it was designed for. The AIF Divisions brought their anti-tank rifles back with them from the desert cam…
Description The ubiquitous 25-pdr was the standard artillery piece of the Australian Army in the Pacific Theatre, as it had been in the desert. The complete lack of roads and the dense jungle terrain encountered on the Pacific islands meant that deploying these guns was extremely difficult. One solution was to modify the gun by removing the gun shield and shortening the barrel. These were known as…
Description These were local men recruited in New Guinea and led by Australian officers and senior NCOs. They were superb jungle fighters who, being local men, were particularly good at reconnaissance. They were also almost impossible to ambush. They fought from the Kokoda campaign right through to end of the war against Imperial Japan. This set contains a metal 10-man section consisting of: 1 NCO…