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Australian

Bolt Action Allied Star Dice Bag Bolt Action Allied Star Dice Bag
£12.00
Out of stock
Dice bag for Bolt Action
Bolt Action Australian 2-pdr light anti-tank gun (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian 2-pdr light anti-tank gun (Pacific)
£13.00
£11.70
1 in stock
At the outbreak of war, the QF 2-pdr was the standard anti-tank gun of the British Army. It was an adequate weapon for the time, being slightly more effective in terms of armour penetration then the contemporary German 37mm PaK 36. Most anti-tank men were reassigned under the Jungle Division restructure. Those few that remained formed ‘Tank Attack’ units and were equipped with both 2pdr and 6pdr A…
Bolt Action Australian 40mm Bofors AA gun (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian 40mm Bofors AA gun (Pacific)
£18.00
£16.20
1 in stock
One of the most popular and recognisable anti-aircraft guns of WWII, the Bofors was used by many Allied and Axis forces. Often firing over open sights at ground targets as well as it's intended role as an anti-craft gun, the Bofors was the most common anti-aircraft gun of the war. The Bofors saw action in every theatre, and provided a reliable anti-aircraft mount that is still in use to this day!…
Bolt Action Australian 6-pdr anti-tank gun (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian 6-pdr anti-tank gun (Pacific)
£13.00
£11.70
1 in stock
The QF 6-pdr was the highly successful replacement for the 2-pdr, being copied by the Americans as the 57mm gun, M1. Its useful lifespan was extended by new developments in ammunition that improved its armour penetration capabilities allowing it to knock out heavy tanks from the flank. Although supplemented by the 17-pdr, it was never entirely replaced and continued to serve in infantry units long…
Bolt Action Australian 75mm pack howitzer (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian 75mm pack howitzer (Pacific)
£13.00
£11.70
1 in stock
The ubiquitous 25pdr was the standard artillery piece of the Australian Army in the Pacific theatre, as it had been in the desert. The complete lack of roads and the dense jungle terrain encountered on the Pacific islands meant that deploying these guns was extremely difficult. One solution was to modify the gun by removing the gun shield and shortening the barrel. These were known as the 25pdr ‘S…
Bolt Action Australian Forward Observer team (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian Forward Observer team (Pacific)
£5.00
£4.50
1 in stock
Although the terrain prevented constant artillery support, in some key battles the Australian Field Regiment’s 25pdrs could be dragged into position to soften up a Japanese defensive position. If conditions were suitable, Australians could also call upon the 1st Tactical Air Force consisting of RAAF fighter-bombers. Models supplied unassembled and unpainted
Bolt Action Australian Independent Commando squad Bolt Action Australian Independent Commando squad
£15.00
£13.50
1 in stock
The Australian Army raised a number of units for commando-style operations during the Second World War – the first being the twelve Independent Commando Companies formed between 1941 and 1942. Predominantly serving in New Guinea, the Dutch East Indies and Borneo their task was to perform raids, demolition, sabotage, subversion, and organisation of civil resistance against the Japanese. The Indepen…
Bolt Action Australian Jungle Division infantry section (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian Jungle Division infantry section (Pacific)
£15.00
£13.50
1 in stock
Description In early 1943, the Australian Army reorganised its militia and Australian Imperial Force divisions into a lighter version of the standard British Army organisation. These new Jungle Divisions, had vastly more short-ranged firepower, 981 SMGs as to the previous 400, for instance. The lack of roads or open terrain saw the men of now unnecessary support, transport and anti-aircraft units…
Bolt Action Australian Matilda II infantry tank Bolt Action Australian Matilda II infantry tank
£26.00
£23.40
1 in stock
Although obsolete in the European theatre, the A12 Matilda II infantry tank’s heavy armour and proven weaponry were ideal against the lightly equipped Japanese forces in the Far East. The nature of the terrain precluded the large armoured formations experienced in North Africa. Instead, the Matilda-equipped Australian 4th Armoured Brigade was broken up and deployed as individual troops of three ta…
Bolt Action Australian medic team (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian medic team (Pacific)
£8.00
£7.20
1 in stock
Medical support in the jungle was vital, with tropical diseases causing more casualties than enemy fire. Lucky for the Australians, they could call on the local Papuans to assist them in evacuating the wounded by stretcher as the terrain made it impossible for vehicles to perform this role. In the Pacific theatre, the Japanese often deliberately targeted medics, so the Australians stopped wearing…
Bolt Action Australian medium mortar team (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian medium mortar team (Pacific)
£7.00
£6.30
1 in stock
Description In most jungle operations the 3-inch mortar was the main, often only, form of artillery support available. In the reorganised Jungle Divisions, from 1943 onwards, the number of mortars was doubled to include two full platoons of these weapons. Models supplied unassembled and unpainted
Bolt Action Australian Militia Infantry Section Bolt Action Australian Militia Infantry Section
£15.00
£13.50
1 in stock
Description The militia was trained and equipped to a lesser degree than their regular counterparts in the Australian Imperial Force and only allowed to be deployed within Australia and its mandated territories. This led to the AIF’s derogatory nickname of Chockos, for the militia – chocolate soldiers who would melt in the heat of battle. There was little love lost between the formations although…
Bolt Action Australian Officer Team (pacific) Bolt Action Australian Officer Team (pacific)
£5.00
£4.50
1 in stock
Description Many Australian officers who commanded militia units in the far flung corners of New Guinea and its surrounding islands were veterans of World War I but had spent decades in civilian trades. By 1943, most officers were either AIF veterans of the campaigns in the Middle East and North Africa or hard-pressed militiamen who had learned their trade on the front lines in New Guinea. Warlord…
Bolt Action Australian PIAT and anti-tank rifle teams (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian PIAT and anti-tank rifle teams (Pacific)
£6.00
£5.40
1 in stock
Description The Australian Army was supplied by Britain with the PIAT anti-tank weapon, but this saw only extremely limited use by the Australians, as the threat from Japanese tanks was minimal. The weapon found more use against Japanese emplacements as an improvised bunker-buster than the role it was designed for. The AIF Divisions brought their anti-tank rifles back with them from the desert cam…
Bolt Action Australian platoon scout team (Pacific) Bolt Action Australian platoon scout team (Pacific)
£5.00
£4.50
1 in stock
Japanese ambushes required a change in tactics to the desert fighting experienced so far. Instead of having the majority of a platoon’s sections ‘up front’, the Australians learnt to hold their platoons main strength in reserve until the enemy revealed himself. The forward scouts led the way for their platoon, risking death at any moment, this job was rotated regularly to make sure the scouts were…

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Dice bag for Bolt Action
At the outbreak of war, the QF 2-pdr was the standard anti-tank gun of the British Army. It was an adequate weapon for the time, being slightly more effective in terms of armour penetration then the contemporary German 37mm PaK 36. Most anti-tank men were reassigned under the Jungle Division restructure. Those few that remained formed ‘Tank Attack’ units and were equipped with both 2pdr and 6pdr A…
One of the most popular and recognisable anti-aircraft guns of WWII, the Bofors was used by many Allied and Axis forces. Often firing over open sights at ground targets as well as it's intended role as an anti-craft gun, the Bofors was the most common anti-aircraft gun of the war. The Bofors saw action in every theatre, and provided a reliable anti-aircraft mount that is still in use to this day!…
The QF 6-pdr was the highly successful replacement for the 2-pdr, being copied by the Americans as the 57mm gun, M1. Its useful lifespan was extended by new developments in ammunition that improved its armour penetration capabilities allowing it to knock out heavy tanks from the flank. Although supplemented by the 17-pdr, it was never entirely replaced and continued to serve in infantry units long…
The ubiquitous 25pdr was the standard artillery piece of the Australian Army in the Pacific theatre, as it had been in the desert. The complete lack of roads and the dense jungle terrain encountered on the Pacific islands meant that deploying these guns was extremely difficult. One solution was to modify the gun by removing the gun shield and shortening the barrel. These were known as the 25pdr ‘S…
Although the terrain prevented constant artillery support, in some key battles the Australian Field Regiment’s 25pdrs could be dragged into position to soften up a Japanese defensive position. If conditions were suitable, Australians could also call upon the 1st Tactical Air Force consisting of RAAF fighter-bombers. Models supplied unassembled and unpainted
The Australian Army raised a number of units for commando-style operations during the Second World War – the first being the twelve Independent Commando Companies formed between 1941 and 1942. Predominantly serving in New Guinea, the Dutch East Indies and Borneo their task was to perform raids, demolition, sabotage, subversion, and organisation of civil resistance against the Japanese. The Indepen…
Description In early 1943, the Australian Army reorganised its militia and Australian Imperial Force divisions into a lighter version of the standard British Army organisation. These new Jungle Divisions, had vastly more short-ranged firepower, 981 SMGs as to the previous 400, for instance. The lack of roads or open terrain saw the men of now unnecessary support, transport and anti-aircraft units…
Although obsolete in the European theatre, the A12 Matilda II infantry tank’s heavy armour and proven weaponry were ideal against the lightly equipped Japanese forces in the Far East. The nature of the terrain precluded the large armoured formations experienced in North Africa. Instead, the Matilda-equipped Australian 4th Armoured Brigade was broken up and deployed as individual troops of three ta…
Medical support in the jungle was vital, with tropical diseases causing more casualties than enemy fire. Lucky for the Australians, they could call on the local Papuans to assist them in evacuating the wounded by stretcher as the terrain made it impossible for vehicles to perform this role. In the Pacific theatre, the Japanese often deliberately targeted medics, so the Australians stopped wearing…
Description In most jungle operations the 3-inch mortar was the main, often only, form of artillery support available. In the reorganised Jungle Divisions, from 1943 onwards, the number of mortars was doubled to include two full platoons of these weapons. Models supplied unassembled and unpainted
Description The militia was trained and equipped to a lesser degree than their regular counterparts in the Australian Imperial Force and only allowed to be deployed within Australia and its mandated territories. This led to the AIF’s derogatory nickname of Chockos, for the militia – chocolate soldiers who would melt in the heat of battle. There was little love lost between the formations although…
Description Many Australian officers who commanded militia units in the far flung corners of New Guinea and its surrounding islands were veterans of World War I but had spent decades in civilian trades. By 1943, most officers were either AIF veterans of the campaigns in the Middle East and North Africa or hard-pressed militiamen who had learned their trade on the front lines in New Guinea. Warlord…
Description The Australian Army was supplied by Britain with the PIAT anti-tank weapon, but this saw only extremely limited use by the Australians, as the threat from Japanese tanks was minimal. The weapon found more use against Japanese emplacements as an improvised bunker-buster than the role it was designed for. The AIF Divisions brought their anti-tank rifles back with them from the desert cam…
Japanese ambushes required a change in tactics to the desert fighting experienced so far. Instead of having the majority of a platoon’s sections ‘up front’, the Australians learnt to hold their platoons main strength in reserve until the enemy revealed himself. The forward scouts led the way for their platoon, risking death at any moment, this job was rotated regularly to make sure the scouts were…